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Mounting Windows drives

Even though this like many other tasks is easy once you learn it. Finding documentation on the web can be difficult due to the commonality of the words you must search on.

bash# fdisk -s
/dev/ad0: 1222 cyl 255 hd 63 sec

PartStartSizeTypeFlags
1:6371649270x070x00
2:9381960102494700xa50x80
3:716499022169700x050x00

in Microsoft speak
IBM IBM-DJSA-210 10gig, actually 9.5gig

PartDriveSizeType
1:C:\4gigntfs
2:E:\1gigextended dos
3:freebsd5gigufs

In order to see the Windows 2000 C:\ drive,
mkdir /dos
cd /dev
ls ad0*
Note: this works only for IDE drives.
If ad0s1 is not there, sh MAKEDEV ad0s1
mount -t ntfs /dev/ad0s1 /dos

In order to see the Windows 2000 E:\ drive,
mkdir /dos2
cd /dev
ls ad0*
Note: this works only for IDE drives.
If ad0s5 is not there, sh MAKEDEV ad0s5
mount -t msdos /dev/ad0s5 /dos2

In order to do this automatically when you reboot, you must edit your /etc/fstab

Important Note: When you mount, you must umount or risk the possibility of corrupting your file system. When you gracefully exit, you umount. Powering down without rebooting is not graceful.

Important Note: Do not write to the C:\ drive within freebsd. You can make Windows unbootable. If you write to the extended dos E:\ drive, you may want to move the files out of it before you reboot.